Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 25th World Congress on Nursing Care Melbourne, Australia.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Heather J. Sobko

Utah College of Nursing,USA

Keynote: Nursing Informatics: Challenges and Opportunities
Nursing Care Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Heather J. Sobko photo
Biography:

Dr. Sobko is internationally recognized for her leadership in Nursing Informatics and for developing innovative tools for patient engagement, promotion of patient-centered care, quality improvement, care transitions and advanced illness and multimorbidities. She is Associate Professor and Director of Nursing Informatics at the University of Utah College of Nursing, a Fellow of the National Readmission Prevention Collaborative and the Founder of IVR Care Transition Systems, Interactive Health Robots (i-HEROS), and the Cancer Survivor Research Collaborative. Dr. Sobko has numerous publications and is a reviewer for several peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Nursing Care Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lobel A Lurie photo
Biography:

Dr. Lobel Lurie is a Board Certified Nursing Professional Development Specialist. Received her BSN in the Philippines; Master of Arts in Nursing at Teacher’s College, Columbia University, and Doctor of Nursing Practice, from American Sentinel University. She was recognized as one of the best orthopedic nurses in the U.S. Holds Best Practice in Nursing Professional Development for Nurse Extern program. Recently, she was honored as a North Carolina Great 100 Nurse for advancing nursing practice.

Abstract:

  • Nursing Care Education and Research

Session Introduction

Chris Gaul

Nelson Marlbourough Institute of Technology, New Zealand

Title: The trials and tribulations of introducing the use of technology in an undergraduate nursing programme
Speaker
Biography:

Chris completed her Masters in Nursing (Clinical) in 2014 and is a Senior Academic Staff member within the Department of Health and Fitness team at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology where she co-ordinates the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing programme. Chris’s research interests prodominately focus on supporting undergraduate nursing education and include attrition strategies and the use of technologies for learning. Her clinical interests are based on her passion to promote best practices in Aged Care and specifically the person with dementia.

Abstract:

As the world becomes more digitally active, the use of technology in education is becoming increasingly more common. The use within undergraduate nursing programmes is no different, but it is probably fair to say this has anecdotally been predominately the use of simulation to replicate clinical scenarios.

There are many different applications, programmes and educational software available to educators. Identifying appropriate tools, understanding their suitability and finding time to become familiar with such technologies can feel like a minefield as a novice user. Motivation, enthusaism and a willingness to extend ones self are key skills required for these challenges.

This presentation will showcase examples of different applications which were introduced with the sole aim of enhancing the learning experience. These include the use of Socratives, One Note Classbook, Moodle and digital mobile devices. Honest lessons learned along the way will be shared and a brief insight for future research will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Lobel Lurie is a Board Certified Nursing Professional Development Specialist. Received her BSN in the Philippines; Master of Arts in Nursing at Teacher’s College, Columbia University, and Doctor of Nursing Practice, from American Sentinel University. She was recognized as one of the best orthopedic nurses in the U.S. Holds Best Practice in Nursing Professional Development for Nurse Extern program. Recently, she was honored as a North Carolina Great 100 Nurse for advancing nursing practice.

Abstract:

The escalating increase in the demand for healthcare workers in the United States links international

workforce migration to fill the need. Cyclic in nature, the global migration of nurses is a major avenue to recruit and retain qualified nursing staff outside the country. The literature in transitioning foreign-educated nurses (FEN) into the workforce has been numerous in the past, however, there is little documentation in the transition utilizing standardized onboarding competencies based on nursing professional development standards, incorporation of lived experiences from current FENs, and onboarding best practices. Guided by Meleis’ Transitions Theory, the three developed onboarding competencies were focused on FEN, Leadership, and Organizational competencies. A qualitative descriptive phenomenological design through the use of semi-structured interview guide utilizes the intentional process of knowing and understanding of integration process by seeking to understand the phenomena and find meaning. The promoted targeted educational investment in foreign-educated nurses could be instrumental in the successful transition to practicefor safe, effective, and efficient delivery of care within the U.S. healthcare.

Speaker
Biography:

Miss Benyapa Thitimapong has completed her PhD from Prince of Songkla University since 2015, Thailand. She is the lecturer of faculty of nursing, Prince of Songkla University. Her research is focused on teenage pregnancy and adolescent mothers in Thailand and has published some papers in international and Thai nation journals.

Abstract:

This study aimed to explore the turning point of first-time Thai adolescent mothers who returned to school during childrearing.

A qualitative study was undertaken to investigate the turning point in transitional stage of adolescent mothers who returned to school while engaged in childrearing. In-depth interviews were carried out with the purposive selected. The participants were 20 adolescent mothers who were a mother and a student simultaneously after giving birth with a healthy baby no more than 2 years, and had undergone the experience of unplanned pregnancies during studies in Southern Thailand. The data were analyzed using content analysis method.

            The finding showed that the adolescent mothers contemplated about their schooling either discontinuing school or continuing school after getting pregnant. However, all of them came back to non-formal educational school after childbirth. The turning points to remain in or to return to school were fulfilling personal life-goals and fulfilling parents’ wishes.

The result of this study can be used as an evidence for nurses who are working at both community health centers and hospital settings.  They can provide care for adolescent mothers to facilitate and support this group about child care, mental support, informational support, and encouragement them to remain in or return to school  to get their life-long success in the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Pataraporn Kheawwan has completed her PhD from Chulalongkorn University. She is the head of  Nursing Professional Development Center. She has set up preceptorship system and initiated nurse residency program for new nurses in her organization.

Abstract:

Preceptorship represents an important aspect in new nurse orientation.  However, there were no formal preceptor training program developed for nurse preceptor in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

Objective: The purposes of this study were to develop and evaluate formal preceptor training program for nurse preceptors in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

Method: A research and development study design was utilized in this study. Participants were 37 nurse preceptors. The program contents were delivered by e-learning material, class lecture, group discussion followed by simulation training. Knowledge of the participants was assessed pre and post program. Skill and critical thinking were assessed using Preceptor Skill & Decision Making Evaluation form at the end of program.

Results: Statistical significant difference in knowledge regarding preceptor role and coaching strategies between pre and post program were found.  All participants had satisfied skill and decision making score after completed the program. Most of participants perceived benefits of preceptor training course.

Conclusion: The results of this study reveal that KCMH preceptorship course is an effective formal training course for nurse preceptors

Speaker
Biography:

Chanya Thanomlikhit has completed her Master degree from Chulalongkorn University.  She  worked in emergency department for 16 years. Currenly, she works as a clinical nurse educator, Department of Nursing, King chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Her major responsibility is on new nurses training nad orientation.

Abstract:

Transition from student to staff nurse can be difficult for nurses beginning their nursing profession.  

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the transition experiences during the first year of practice among new nurses in Thailand. 

Methods: A descriptive design using a survey questionnaire was used.  One hundred seventy eight new graduate nurses from one tertiary hospital in Thailand were participated in this study. Data were collected using paper-and-pencil format of the Revised Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey .

Results:  Participants reported three types of difficulties they were experiencing during the first year of practice including role expectation, lack of confidence, and workload. New nurses reported uncomfortable to perform high risk skills such as code/emergency, ventilator care, EKG, and chest tube care. Organizing, prioritizing and communication were rated as difficult tasks during 12-month transition period. New nurses satisfied the benefit package they received from the institution, however, salary was lowest satisfied.

Conclusion:  Results inform transition program development for new nurses.  Initiatives of systems that support for the graduate nurse during the first year of practice is suggested.

Speaker
Biography:

Rosario Arcaya Nievera is a staff nurse, preceptor, and mentor in the cardiothoracic intensive care unit, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri. Ann Fick is a certified cardiovascular and pulmonary clinical specialist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and director of clinical education at Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri. Hilary K. Harris is the manager of the rehabilitation department at Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Abstract:

To assess the safety of mobility in patients receiving low dose norepinephrine(.05 μg /kg/min) by examining mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) before and after activity with parameters set by the physician.

Background: Norepinephrine is a peripheral vasoconstrictor administered for acute hypotension. Norepinephrine is quick acting and increases arterial BP with little effects on HR or cardiac output. During activity, blood flows to the periphery to supply muscles with oxygen which may oppose norepinephrine vasoconstriction. Questions exist regarding the safety of mobilizing patients receiving norepinephrine.

Methods: A retrospective chart review of physical therapy (PT) intervention of 47 patients during the first patient transfer to chair or ambulation with norepinephrine infusing. Data including HR, MAP, norepinephrine dose and activity performed were extracted. Paired t-tests compared MAP and HR pre and post PT. A Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to evaluate differences among norepinephrine doses and physical activity levels.

Results: Forty-one of the forty-seven patients (87%) tolerated the activity within safe vital sign ranges as recommended per their physician. The change in patients' MAP from pre to post activity was not statistically significant (p=.160), while a significant increase in HR occurred after activity (p <.001). A Kruskal-Wallis H test showed no significant difference in the norepinephrine dose and activity level (χ2 = 6.34, p = 0.17).

There were no instances of cardiopulmonary or respiratory arrest during any PT sessions.

Conclusions: The results of this study offer preliminary support of the safety of mobilizing patients receiving low dose norepinephrine

  • Cancer Nursing

Session Introduction

Heather J. Sobko

Utah College of Nursing, USA

Title: Cancer Survivorship: Coordinating a Complex Lifelong Journey
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sobko is internationally recognized for her leadership in Nursing Informatics and for developing innovative tools for patient engagement, promotion of patient-centered care, quality improvement, care transitions and advanced illness and multimorbidities. She is Associate Professor and Director of Nursing Informatics at the University of Utah College of Nursing, a Fellow of the National Readmission Prevention Collaborative and the Founder of IVR Care Transition Systems, Interactive Health Robots (i-HEROS), and the Cancer Survivor Research Collaborative. Dr. Sobko has numerous publications and is a reviewer for several peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Survivorship from all form of cancer has increased exponentially during the last decade, but the coordination of care to support patients in addressing short and long term effects of treatment has not kept pace. Established Care Coordination models generally include case management (designed to assist individuals with complex physical, social and emotional health needs at risk for significant adverse outcomes) and transitional care (processes involved in linking care across settings). These models focus on improving quality while reducing costs, and have demonstrated significant success in improving discharge processes, communication across care settings and reduction of preventable readmissions during the tenuous thirty-day time period post discharge. However, they do not address the life-long follow-up needs of surveillance, health promotion and managing the physical, psychological, spiritual, social and long-term late effects faced by cancer survivors post-treatment. Further, there is increasing need for information to support primary care clinicians who care for survivors after discharge from oncology specialists. The American Cancer Society and the American Society for Clinical Oncology recommend comprehensive Survivorship Care Plans to track details about the care received during treatment and the need for future check-ups, cancer tests and potential long-term late effects of treatment. However, these plans are time consuming and resource intensive and guidelines for addressing these issues by cancer type are limited. Nurse care managers and coordinators are ideally qualified to take the lead in developing Survivorship Care Plans and to generate the evidence needed for standardized guidelines that support patients and their primary care providers during the life-long survivorship journey. To highlight the magnitude and severity of long-term effects of cancer treatment, Table 1 provides an epidemiological overview of the increase of seven selected diseases experienced by adult cancer survivors when compared with adults without a history of cancer.

Speaker
Biography:

Samonnan Thasaneesuwan has studied PhD (Nursing) at Faculty of Nursing, Prince of Songkla University, Thailand. She is a nurse instructor of Adult and Elderly Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, Prince of Songkla University. My interested area is oncology nursing , chronic illness, and education.

Abstract:

This single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a repeated measures design was aimed at determining the effects of a Buddhist-based, Nurse-delivered Program on the psychological symptom cluster and Spiritual Well-being of Thai women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The sample consisted of 93 women with stage I-III breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy at the Chemotherapy Infusion Center of a university hospital in southern Thailand. The subjects were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. The experimental group (n = 45) received the Buddhist-based, Nurse-delivered program involving the following three main activities: raising self-awareness, integrated Buddhist principle of Four Noble Truths, and self-reflection regarding psychological symptom cluster and the progress of Buddhist practices. The control group (n = 48) received usual care only. The instrument consisted of 1) the Psychological Symptom Subscale (MSAS-PSYCH) and 2) Thai Spiritual Well-being Assessment Tool Patients with Breast Cancer (TSWBATPBC). Data were collected on three occasions at baseline, Cycle 3, and Cycle 6 of Chemotherapy. The data were then analyzed by using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, independent t-test, and repeated measures ANOVA.
There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores for the psychological symptom cluster and Spiritual Well-being scores over time in the experimental group (p < .05), while the interaction of time by group was not statistically significant concerning the psychological symptom cluster and Spiritual Well-being (p > .05).
The BbNdP is an alternative intervention in relieving the psychological symptom cluster and enhancing Spiritual Well-being for women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.